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Organizational Leadership: Library Guide

This guide is your link between the Organizational Leadership program and CVTC Library!

Semester Learning Center Hours


Monday - Thursday

7:30 am - 8:00 pm

Friday

7:30 am - 5:00 pm

Saturday

9:00 am - 3:00 pm


Librarian

Vince Mussehl's picture
Vince Mussehl
Contact:
CVTC Library & Technology Services
Chippewa Valley Technical College
620 W. Clairemont Ave.
Eau Claire, WI 54701
715-833-6285
Website / Blog Page

Library Technology Checkout

Get the technology you need to get your work done!

CVTC Library checks out:

  • Laptops
  • iPads
  • Study Rooms
  • DSLR Cameras
  • Camcorders
  • Chromecasts
  • Chargers
  • Microphones

More information or Make a Reservation

Library Search Tutorial

Find Library Resources

Search the Library Catalog

Enter keywords, subject, author, title, or instructor below and click Search.

Access Your Library Account | Find a Database | Find an E-Journal | Interlibrary Loan | Contact Us

Helpful Organizational Leadership Related Databases

What is a Database? 

Great question! Think of a database as a file cabinet. In this file cabinet there are lots of files and each one contains a different resource or piece of information. When you search a database, you are searching thousands of resources for information that relates to what you type in the search box (like Google, just more credible).

These databases will help you in your search!

Click on any of the blue headings below to search a databases.

Evaluating Sources

Remember to think about the following when choosing a topic!

 

Who

  • Who/what organization is responsible for this information?
  • What are the author's credentials or qualifications? What makes him/her an authority on this subject?
  • What is the organization's mission? Do they tell you?
  • If you can't find the answers to these questions, you may want to avoid using the source.

What

  • What makes this source of information credible?
  • What is the review or editorial process that the information has gone through to ensure accuracy? None? Peer-reviewed? Editorial board?

Why

  • Why was this information source created? To Inform or educate? To Persuade? To Sell? To Entertain? To call people to action?
  • Is there a potential for bias? Are differing viewpoints presented? In a balanced way?

Where

  • Where did the information come from?
  • Does the author tell you the source of his/her information? Are sources cited so that you can follow-up and verify them?
  • If the source is a brief report on a research finding or event, can you find an original or more complete source of information on which it is based?

When

  • When was the information created/published?
  • If dates are given, can you tell what they mean? Published? Revised? First posted?
  • Can you determine if the information is current or outdated? Is it important that the information is recent?

How

  • How do you plan to use this information? 
  • Do you need an authoritative source? Do you need an objective source? Do you need a testimonial to support a particular argument?
  • How in-depth is the information? Does it provide enough detailed information for a college level research paper?

What are Primary & Secondary Sources?

PRIMARY SOURCE is a document or record containing firsthand information or original data on a topic. Primary sources are usually created by individuals who experienced the event and recorded or wrote about it. 

Common examples of primary sources include:

  • Letters, Diaries, Memoirs, Speeches, Newspapers written at time of event
  • Court cases, Manuscripts, Patents, Audio/Visual Recordings, Census Figures
  • Photographs, Artwork, Artifacts, Maps
  • Original research studies
  • Interviews and Oral Histories

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SECONDARY SOURCE is one that was created later by someone that did not experience firsthand or participate in the events in which the author is writing about. Secondary sources often summarize, interpret, analyze or comment on information found in primary sources.

Common examples of secondary sources include:

  • Most Books, Biographies, Essays
  • Encyclopedias, Literary Criticisms
  • Journal articles that do not present new research

Citations in a Nutshell...

  • Have a citation style book or web page handy.
  • Be consistent when citing your sources.
  • Librarians and Academic Services are here to help!

Citation Tracker

Mendeley

A free cloud-based program that automatically cites your sources, stores your articles, and can be shared with anyone you allow.